Share Your Best Chess Moves Here





What chess moves get you on the front foot right from the gun? Do you like to rip into the enemy right from the start? Or do you prefer to get your own house in order first before slowly grinding your opponent down, strangling the life out of his position? Are you a python or a cobra?


Let's hear about your tactical tricks in the middlegame. How you scheme towards winning exchanges. How do you maneuver your pieces onto the best squares?


Share your best tips for pushing home an advantage in the endgame. How do you close the deal? You know the rules now, how to move the King and all the rest. Let's get you starting to think about strategy.


Building a Kingside Attack




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Rook on a light squareBlack King on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Black Queen on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Moves: Bloodgood - Evans, Norfolk (1961); 21.Nf7# wins the game with a smothered mate, this is the culmination of well constructed Kingside attack

How do you put together your Kingside attacks? What's your secret to breaking down the enemy defenses on your way through to the King? You like going straight for the throat?


Of course the thematic strikes on the Kingside now have an extensive blueprint to guide you in a step by step approach. The initial posting of the pieces in preparation. Well known maneuvers often involving sacrifices. Whole opening systems have been devised with an early assault on the opposing King as the primary goal.


Maybe this isn't your strongest area as a chess player. If you need some help you can look at instructive games to give you some ideas. Start with these Kingside attacks.


Overwhelm Them Positionally




Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack King on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Queen on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light square
Black Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light square

Chess Moves: Spassky - Fischer (Reykjavik, 1972); Slowly but surely Black expertly strangles the Bishop Pair. His maneuvering and restriction of White's pieces pressurizes White and eventually he cracks. 27...Bxa4 forces the resignation.

Of course the first step on the road to victory is winning the positional battle. Claiming the majority of space for your pieces will make yours more effective and your opponent's pieces weaker.


Taking the center along with key files and diagonals puts your forces in prime position to attack while giving enemy pieces feet of clay.


On your journey of discovery you will hear about things like outposts, half-open files, long diagonals, exchange sacrifices, the 7th rank and all sorts of things that will come into play as you try to outmaneuver your adversaries. These are the elements you will consider as you refine your positional play.


Unleash the Killer Combination




Tal - Averkin (Moscow, 1973); The Magician from Riga was in a long absorbing tussle here with tactical threats from both players lurking beneath the surface all the way through. The game is decided in White's favor by 70.Nd5. Black can't escape # without the loss of his Rook.

Chess Moves: Tal - Averkin (Moscow, 1973); The Magician from Riga was in a long absorbing tussle here with tactical threats from both players lurking beneath the surface all the way through. The game is decided in White's favor by 70.Nd5. Black can't escape # without material loss.

Some of our fondest wins are the ones where we are in a tough, even contest against a determined opponent. It's hard to see how to create an advantage, a winning advantage.


Then we put it together. A cleverly disguised tactical maneuver. We manage to set the trap without raising the suspicions of our opponent. Finally we spring the trap.


A three to four move combination. We may even sacrifice a piece in it's duration. At the end is a checkmate. Or a big material gain. Or a winning positional edge. Have you ever put together a killer combination?


Turning the Tables




Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
White King on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Moves: Alekhine - German Officer (Simul, 1943); The German Officer with the Black pieces resigned believing his position to be lost. Alekhine played Black from this position and the Officer played White. Within a couple of moves the German was resigning again so Alekhine swapped pieces again and won the game with White.

Often when we are in a bleak position our thoughts turn to resignation. We don't want to invest any more time and energy in a hopeless situation. All that lies ahead is painful and apparently fruitless defense.

Is it absolutely hopeless though? Many bad positions contain defensive resources that are not easily seen at first glance. If you look deeper into the position and analyze you may find ways to cause endless frustration for your smug opponent.

He may be already considering the game won and may not be in the right psychological state to work hard to refute your defiant defense. Complacency may prove his undoing.

Before you resign take some time and see if there is some way you can save the game. There have been some remarkable instances of people in an apparently poor position turning the tables.


Know Some Terrifying Chess Move Combinations?

Know some chess moves and combinations to get the initiative in the game? Little tips and tricks that win a piece from an unsuspecting opponent? Share a game you played where you hatched a clever tactical plan and won material. Or a decisive positional edge. If you prefer you can share a game played by a master containing good tactical tricks. Share your Terrifying Chess Move Combinations.

Chess Moves that Rock by other Lapocites

Click below to see Chess Combos that Rock from other Lapocites...

Caro Kann Gone Wrong 
The Caro Kann has a name as a sturdy defense that is hard to break down. But in this game White tears it apart in just 11 moves with terrific play. A Knight …

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Moving On





You can share tips and tricks, you can pick some up. Chess is about recognizing familiar patterns that come up time and again. Get a feel for what chess moves work and which ones don't. What's on, what's not.


It's also quite useful to learn these little combos because when you start out in chess your opponents will try them on you. And when you've learned them you can try them out on your opponents.


If you're still just learning how to play, how to move the pieces, don't worry. You're right where you need to be. First things first. Get to grips with the basic chess rules.