Chess Gambit - Blackmar, Budapest, CK


Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Blackmar-Diemer Main Starting Position - 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Nxf3

The chess gambit is the best way to inject fun into your online blitz games. Like the Bishop's Opening, the Blackmar complex contains more than just the seed gambit itself. First you have the direct descendent, the Blackmar-Diemer.

Even inside the Blackmar-Diemer you have more gambits which arise in individual lines. The Ryder Gambit and the Hubsch Gambit are interesting variations that you can work on.

After a quick look at the Blumenfeld Gambit it's time to move on to the Budapest Gambit. This one also contains further gambits within it's lines. The Farajowicz Gambit and the Balogh Gambit.

The Caro-Kann has three gambits lurking in it's variations. The Alekhine Gambit, Godley Gambit and Rasa-Sturdier Gambit are all worth a look. Finally we can sign off with a trip down the streets and alleys of the Catalan. Here the Catalan Queen's Gambit should give you some interesting ideas for your games.


The Original Blackmar Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Blackmar Gambit - 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.f3

The Blackmar Gambit was developed by Armand Blackmar late in the 19th Century. The idea is to give up a pawn in order to gain a huge lead in development.


What you really want is for Black to accept the gambit with 3...exf3 and you will play 4.Nxf3 or even 4.Qxf3. You are down a pawn but you have a piece developed and both Bishops opened and ready to come into the game.


This gambit caused excitement for a short while. Then Black made an important discovery to stop it dead in it's tracks. 3...e5! curbs any dynamic advantage that White can hope to get from this opening. It was not the end of the concept however. Emil Josef Diemer found a great modification to resuscitate the gambit.


The Blackmar-Diemer Queenside Gamble




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Blackmar-Diemer Gambit - 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3

The Blackmar-Diemer Gambit was the solution to 3...e5! in the original Blackmar Gambit. You play 3.Nc3 Nf6 before proceeding with 4.f3. Now 4...e5 isn't so effective as it was in the Blackmar. 5.dxe5 kicks the Knight and Black finds himself in a passive position.


The Main Line continues 3...Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Nxf3 and then the game can go down several different roads. 5...Bf5 takes the game into the Gunderam Defense. 5...Bg4 is the Teichmann Defense.


Black can try the Euwe Defense with 5...e6 where you may end up facing a kind of French Defense situation. The Bogoljubow Defense with 5...g6 and the Ziegler Defense with 5...c6 are also possible.


Live on the Edge in the Ryder Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Ryder Gambit - 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Qxf3

The Ryder Gambit is an option you can take within the wider Blackmar-Diemer Gambit. Play continues in the Main Line with 3...Nf6 4.f3 exf3 and then you come to a fork in the road.


Your main option in the Blackmar-Diemer is of course 5.Nf3. There is another less obvious move here though. You can recapture with the Queen instead of the Knight. Yes, 5.Qxf3 is a move!


You're developing your Queen early instead of your minor piece. You're also dropping your remaining central pawn. This must be suicidal right? No because after 5...Qxd4 you have 6.Be3 developing with tempo and preparing to castle long. You are down two pawns but you do have a big lead in development.


Nail the Blackmar-Diemer with the Hubsch Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Hubsch Gambit - 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 Nxe4

The Hubsch Gambit is a great response to the Blackmar-Diemer when you play as Black. You can by playing 3...Nxe4 take the game down your road and away from the kind of positions that White is playing for.


This has two main points. Firstly you are avoiding all that theory that White was itching to throw at you. Secondly the frustration stemming from not being able to play his pet lines may lead to mistakes in your opponent's game. That's the psychological value.


You can be the one to decide how the game goes with at least an equal position. After 4.Nxe4 dxe4 5.Bc4 there are 5 main continuations. You have 5...e6, 5...Bf5, 5...g6, 5...c5 and also 5...Nc6 to choose from.


Burst Through the Center with the Blumenfeld Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Blumenfeld Gambit - 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4.Nf3 b5

The Blumenfeld Gambit is very similar to the Benko Gambit. The difference here is you are playing for a powerful mobile center instead of the open a and b-files seen in the Benko.


After 5.dxe6 fxe6 6.cxb5 you will play the key move 6...d5. Now you have pawns on c5, d5 and e6. White unusually for a 1.d4 opening will have a small center and also a central minority.


If you don't like having an imposing, mobile center there are other ways to play the Blumenfeld. You can run with 6...a6 which will likely lead to a more Benko orientated game.


Use Trickery in the Budapest Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Budapest Gambit - 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5

The Budapest Gambit was first seen in tournament play in Budapest in 1896 (Adler vs Maroczy). This was a low profile game however and the opening was not used frequently for another 22 years.

It was only when Milan Vidmar used it to shock Akiba Rubinstein in Berlin in 1918 that it attracted attention from the elite. Black offers his King's pawn for a sacrifice. If White accepts there are three main lines that the opening can continue with.

The Adler Variation where White abandons the extra pawn and develops his minor pieces; the Alekhine Variation where White builds a formidable pawn structure in the center; or else if White develops Knight before Bishop, the Rook Lift can give Black good pressure on White's castled King.


Sharp or Careful in the Balogh Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Balogh Gambit - 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 Ng4 4.e4 d6

The Balogh Gambit is another trick Black can use instead of simply taking on e5. White can answer in two ways. He can pressurize the Knight on g4 with 5.Bd2. Or he can accept the gambit with 5.dxe6.


5.Bd2 develops steadily and invites the Black Knight to take back the e5-pawn. This line is one that affords both players a fairly equal game.


Capablanca played this move against Tartakower. A tactical game followed after Black castled long. He couldn't win back the sacrificed pawn and indeed lost another in the ensuing complications. This eventually proved his undoing. White won through his powerful rolling pawn mass on the Kingside.


Throw Shapes in the Farajowicz Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Fajarowicz Gambit - 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 Ne4

The Farajowicz Gambit takes the Budapest away from it's Main Lines which come about after 3...Ng4. You can run with instead with 3...Ne4 allowing White to hold on to his material.


Here you will exert pressure against White along the e1-a5 diagonal. The dark square Bishop will jump into b4 with check. Bishop and Knight will make nuisances of themselves with double control on c3. The Knight is also hitting d2. ...d5 is a dangerous idea here. You can try to bring the Queen into the game on the d-file.


As White the best way to meet this ploy is to simply keep cool and develop logically. You can't go wrong with a move like Nf3. Exchange off Black's offensive minor pieces on d2 and maybe castle long.


Alekhine Gambit - Lay the Center Bait




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Alekhine Gambit - 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nf6 5.Bd3

The Alekhine Gambit is the first of three in the Caro-Kann Defense. Black has several possible responses in the position. The two main replies boil down to accepting with 5...Qxd4 or declining with 5...Nxe4.


Both of these moves are quite successful for Black. 5...Qxe4 has a 47% win rate for Black with White winning just 30% of the time. It's clear that White cannot prove he has adequate compensation for his d-pawn.


5...Nxe4 is even better for Black with a 50% success rate after this move. White wins just 1 in 4 with a further 1 in 4 ending in a draw. By declining the gambit Black does not allow White to get a lead in development.


Thwart the Exchange Variation with the Godley Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Godley Gambit - 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 Nf6

The Godley Gambit is a great way to reintroduce some imbalances back into the game if White opts for the Exchange Variation. White may want to suck the life out of the game with 3.exd5. 3...Nf6 invites White to take another pawn where you would get a lead in development.


After 4.dxc6 Nxc6 5.Nf3 Bg4 6.c3, Black has three minor pieces developed to White's one. Even though White seems to have a fearsome Queenside pawn chain led by the proud d4-pawn he will not get it all his own way.


Black can launch a minority attack on the Queenside. When his two pawns disappear, White's pawn chain starting on a2, b2, c3 and d4 will be greatly weakened.


Rasa-Sturdier Gambit - Blackmar vs Caro-Kann




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Rasa-Sturdier Gambit - 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.f3

The Rasa-Sturdier Gambit comes about when you go for a Blackmar-Diemer set-up against the Caro-Kann. The main characteristic of this gambit against the Caro-Kann is the absence of White's Queenside play.


In a regular Blackmar-Diemer you would see the light square Bishop regularly on c4 or b5. Not in the Rasa-Sturdier as the Black pawns on c6 and d5 rule that out.


You will trying to castle Queenside and launching the Kingside at Black. Nc3 and Bf4 will be played quickly. The Queen will go to d2 or f3 and you will then castle. Pawn storms primarily on the g and h-files will set the attack in motion.


Catalan Queens Gambit - Rule the Long Diagonal




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Catalan Queen's Gambit - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.g3

When is a Queen's Gambit really a Queen's Gambit? Many people argue with some justification that 1.d4 d5 2.c4 isn't really a gambit at all. Black cannot hold his pawn after 2...dxc4 without sustaining major damage on his Queenside.

Let's say though that White wants to fianchetto his light square Bishop. After 2...e6 he would play 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.g3. Now the game is a Catalan Queen's Gambit. The Catalan Opening is basically a Queen's Gambit Opening with the light square Bishop on g2.

Doesn't this just allow Black to keep his pawn advantage? Can't he now shore up c4 with a move like ...b5 for instance? Well not really. The real power of the Catalan Opening is this Catalan Bishop raking across Black's Queenside.

If you play ...dxc4 and then ...b5 without thinking about it you can open yourself up to some devastating tactics. Ne5 unmasking the light square Bishop and Bf4 controlling the b8-h2 diagonal can make life rather unpleasant.


Moving On




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Chess Gambit: Danish Gambit Accepted - 1.e4 e5 2.d4 exd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Bc4 cxb2 5.Bxb2

The Blackmar-Diemer complex is a nice way to keep your game fresh. The Ryder and the Hubsch are waiting inside to be unfurled should the opportunity arise.


The Budapest Gambit is another that in addition to it's own main variations holds further gambit lines. The Farajowicz Gambit and the Balogh Gambit are ways to sharpen the Budapest still further.


As yet we're only scratching the surface in the gambit world. The D & E section has the Danish Gambit, Englund Gambit and Evans Gambit among others.


> Gambits (Bs & Cs)