Sicilian Defence - Exploding Grenades


Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Open Sicilian with 2...d6 - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4

The Sicilian Defence was still in it's infancy, theoretically, until the 1920s. The Classical Variation leading to the Dragon featuring 2...Nc6 was the standard way for Black to play. Everyone was happy.

But along came the Richter Rauzer and the Sozin Attacks and Black's nice carefree plan was torn asunder. No longer could the Classical Variation be relied upon to get Black out of the opening with his Dragon set-up. Gone were the carefree days.

Then a solution was found. By playing 2...d6, Black could play his beloved Dragon, solving all problems. And this is the raison d'etre of the move 2...d6.

The Dragon Variation and Najdorf Variation are two major options that are reached by way of 2...d6. There are exciting options to be discovered within these two. You can now upload your own articles and games on the Sicilian Monster.


Breathe Fire in the Dragon Variation




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Dragon Variation - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6

By playing 2...d6 we can get the Dragon formation we dream of without any irritating moves from White like 6.Bg5 or 6.Bc4. It's a slightly modified version of the old Classical Variation which went with 2...Nc6.


The Dragon Variation itself gives Black great solidity. He also gets plenty of scope for counter play in the center and on the Queenside. He controls many dark squares in the center while White is operating mainly on the light squares.


When you play with the Black pieces you will be taking over the c-file, getting your Bishop on the long diagonal heading towards the enemy King and playing for the pawn-breaks, ...d5 and ...b5. As White you will try to occupy the d5 square with your Queen's Knight and get a Kingside attack going. The same themes that run through many Sicilian Defence lines.


The Sharp and Deadly Yugoslav Attack




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Yugoslav Attack - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3

The Yugoslav Attack is the Main Line of the Dragon Variation. White answers 5...g6 with 6.Be3. If you play this move you're basically getting ready to castle Queenside and throw your Kingside at Black.


If you're playing as Black you will bring your dark square Bishop to the long diagonal on your 6th move. No theatrics just play the normal moves. Fianchetto the Kingside, light square Bishop to d7, Knights to c6 and f6, Queen's Rook to c8 and everything's fine.


White plays 7.f3 to support his e4-pawn. His light square Bishop will go to c4, he will castle long after Qd2 and he is good to go. This is another high wire act. Both sides have a wealth of tactical tricks to try and trap the other. You better know your stuff.


Play it Positional in the Classical Dragon




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Classical Dragon - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2

The Classical Dragon is a modification of the old Classical Sicilian Defence. Here we play the key move 2...d6 instead of 2...Nf6, sidestepping the problems caused by the Rauzer and the Sozin.

You're not obliged as White to go into all kinds of sharp tactical lines. If you prefer to play a positional game you can just run with tradition and play the Classical Dragon just like the old days.

The Classical begins with 6.Be2. You will castle Kingside in this line and you will play a positional game. As Black you will develop just as before.


Strike at Black's Heart in the Levenfish




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Levenfish Variation - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.f4

The Levenfish Variation is another energetic assault from White. He plays 6.f4 before castling or developing his Bishops. The e and f-pawns can cause a bit of havoc in the center if Black sleepwalks through the opening.

The light square Bishop can come to b5 with check. Whichever minor piece blocks the check, the move comes at a price. The center pawns push on with e5, challenging the f6-Knight.

The Knight has to move and the e-pawn keeps going. The minor piece blocking the check is attacked by e6 and the only way to resolve it is to take it off with the f-pawn.

The d4-Knight swoops in to recapture and the Black King is feeling the heat with the pawn structure in ribbons. The Queen is also under attack and Black is in deep trouble in the opening moves. A good option for White to know.


Walk the Tight Rope in the Najdorf




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Black pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Najdorf Variation - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6

The central strike ...e5 became more and more popular in the Sicilian for Black in the 1920s. This was the period when the Sicilian snowballed from a modest, playable option to a fearsome weapon.

6.Be2 was no longer cutting the mustard for White in the Classical Variation. Black was looking at options other than 2...Nc6 for something a little sharper. 2...d6 was developed and found to be conducive to many a razor sharp variation.

One of the most important of these went 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6. It was called the Najdorf Variation. It was named after the Argentinean GM Miguel Najdorf and he made this line popular at the highest level. It allows Black to play an attacking game and yet retain a solid formation.


Launch the English Attack Against the Najdorf




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Black pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: English Attack - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3

The English Attack can show itself in the Najdorf, Scheveningen or Taimanov Variations. We're going to consider it here as it appears in the Najdorf. This is White getting on the front foot and taking it to Black with the response 6.Be3.


This system first appeared in the 1970s when a number of English players worked on it and enjoyed some success. The idea is to castle Queenside and play a well timed g4. The Black King's Knight will know that his time at f6 is short as g5 is inevitable.


It's very important to get the main moves in. f3, Qd2, 0-0-0 and g4 (g4 is a recurring theme for White in the Sicilian). Black has defensive resources available against 6.Be3. He usually plays 6...e6, 6...e5 or 6...Ng4. The English is one of the most important lines in Najdorf.


Play the Hair Raising Poisoned Pawn Variation




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Black pawn on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Poisoned Pawn Variation - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Qb6

The Najdorf like the French has it's own Poisoned Pawn Variation. This time it's White who leaves the b-pawn as bait for the White Queen to attack from b6. In the French the g-pawn is dangled in front of the White Queen in a similar way.


Black plays 6.Bg5 with Rauzer-like ideas in mind. In this position Black has played ...a6 rather than ...Nc6. The pin (as it will be after 6...e6) on the f6-Knight introduces a little bit of psychological tension.


Black plays ...e6 and White responds with 7.f4, making clear his intention for a violent middlegame. Black has a few options here. He can play the Gothenburg (7...Be7), 7...Nbd7 or 7...Qc7. He also has two other options, the Polugaevsky or the Poisoned Pawn (7...Qb6).


The White Knuckle Ride of the Polugaevsky




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Black pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Polugaevsky Variation - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 b5

The Najdorf Variation is known for it's tactical thrillers but few of it's many variations are deadlier than the Polugaevsky. It literally has to come with a health warning.

Many of Black's Najdorf plans include scheming to play ...b5 as quickly as possible. White tries to burn Black's house down but his position is sturdier than you might believe.

White castles Queenside and tries to exploit Black's still central King and flimsy looking Queenside. For Black to play 7...b5 seems to stretch his positional resources to far.

It's true that he needs to play very accurately for several moves to survive. It turns out Black can keep White out of c4 and live to tell the tale. You need to do your homework though. Polugaevsky himself claimed that he spent 6 months analyzing it thoroughly before daring to play it in competition.


Amsterdam Variation - Blast Open the Kingside




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Black pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Amsterdam Variation - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.f4

White can also attack the Najdorf with 6.f4. This is known as the Amsterdam Variation. If you have the White pieces here you're playing for the e5 push that will kick the Knight out of f6.

Line your pieces up primed to attack on the Kingside. If you achieve e5 it won't be long before f5 follows. You're opening up critical lines and diagonals to get at the enemy King.

Of course if you're Black and you see this onslaught coming your way, you don't need to sit there and take it. You can calmly organize your defensive structure. Double fianchettoes have worked well against this system.

Get your ...b5 and ...d5 breaks in. Survive the attack and your active Queenside pieces should be trying to earn you a favorable endgame.


Multi-Level Planning in the Adams Attack




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Black pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Adams Attack - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.h3

Many people say that the Najdorf Variation which occurs with 5...a6 is one of the best openings in chess. That's a big statement. Yet this modest little move sets in motion numerous tactical lines that can melt your head over the board.

It has really put it up to those who say 1.e4 gives White a clear advantage. One of those people was Weaver Adams from the United States. He said 1.e4 "wins by force" and his proposed refutation of the Najdorf is called the Adams Attack.

The Adams Attack is another waiting move, 6.h3. This little move does quite a few jobs. Firstly it prepares g4, threatening not only the Black King but also the f6-Knight. Evicting this Knight with g5 weakens Black's hold on the key d5 square.

The King's Bishop can also be fianchettoed against d5. So the Adams Attack combines tactical ideas of rapid attacks against the "slow" Najdorf Variation and positional ideas of a conquest of d5.


Opocensky Variation for a Slow Burner




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Black pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Sicilian Defence: Opocensky Variation - 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2

During the 70s Black's position was holding up so well against White's aggression that quieter options were again entertained. The Opocensky Variation (6.Be2) became popular with it's echoes of the Classical Variation.


White plays the long game, valuing slight positional plusses. You will use them to craft a full point. Concentrate on creating a strong point on d5 and congregate your minor pieces around it. It's a nice home for a Knight with support from his friends.


If you're playing the Black side of things your goals are clear. Get active pieces and strike with the pawn breaks, ...b5 and ...d5. You want to get ...d5 in before White establishes a piece there.


Share the Secrets of the Sicilian Defense Labyrinth

The Sicilian Defense is infamous in chess circles. It has nearly one entire Volume of the ECO Index dedicated to it's endless variations and possibilities. Whether you talk about the Classical, Najdorf, Scheveningen or Dragon Formation, you're looking at dynamic possibilities for Black in the middlegame if he handles his defensive maneuvers skillfully. Maybe you play the Sicilian regularly and would like to share your thoughts in an article. You can annotate one of your games if you prefer and show us how you used it to win. Or you can annotate a Sicilian game played by a leading chess player of today or yesteryear. Tell us your favorite line in the Sicilian Defense Labyrinth.

Sicilian Defense Articles and Games Left by other Lapocites

Click below to see Sicilian Defense Articles and Games by other Lapocites...

Sicilian Dragon Variation 
Playing a higher rated player in a familiar Variation Prokhov, Vassil (1800) – Galanter, Greg (1580) 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4

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The Sicilian Defense, according to me is the easiest as well as the hardest defense technique of all. I say easiest, because it can be used as the first …

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First and foremost, time is the most important factor in the Sicilian Defense. Many times you might be tempted to play Qa5 or play pawn a6, but be careful …

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Moving On




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Open Sicilian with 2...e6

Add these variations to your repertoire and you will feel your confidence growing. With every Sicilian variation you learn, it reinforces your deep understanding of it. You will see why the Sicilian is ever present at the highest level.

Revisiting themes and motifs that are becoming increasingly familiar, each time with new little twists. Notice how the g4 move comes up here and there for White when he castles long.

Black's play on the c-file over and over. The Scheveningen formation or the Hedgehog showing up apparently out of nowhere in many variations.

And yet there is more to this vast opening. More ideas for both sides stemming off another option for Black on move 2. What happens if Black plays 2...e6?
> Open Sicilian with 2...d6