Play Opening Systems the Gambit Way


Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack King on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark square
Empty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Rook on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite King on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Bird - Blackburne (London, 1886); White resigns after 17...Rf3!, there's no way to stop all threats against g2 and g3 even with the loss of material. This game is a From Gambit.

Adding opening systems from Irregular Openings to your gambit repertoire will give you even more scope to outmaneuver your opponents. This is a different style of play from your QPG gambits.


The gambits here will have a hypermodern feel. The defense of these systems will be more taxing as they contain clever ideas and patterns that most intermediate players won't be familiar with.


Playing on the wings will have different immediate objectives in terms of pawn structure and tactical deflections. In some cases your opponent may not see through your plan until it's too late.


Reti Gambit - Challenge Black's Center




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Reti Gambit - 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4

The Reti Gambit was introduced by Richard Reti in the 1920s. It is a hugely flexible opening allowing you to transpose to a number of major opening families. This is the power of 1.Nf3.


The gambit comes when you challenge 1...d5 with the provocative 2.c4. Can Black take and feel comfortable and confident about his future? The answer is probably not.


You now have a majority in the center and a lead in development. Black's only advantage is in material and he should not invest anything into trying to hold it. He will lose the pawn in the end anyway and his Queenside will be hopelessly compromised in the process.


Attack the Light Squares in the Lisitsin Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Lisitsin Countergambit - 1.e4 f5 2.Nf3

The Lisitsin Gambit plays a little like the From Gambit with similar motifs. After 1.e4 f5 2.Nf3 Black can accept with 2...fxe5. You will reply with 3.Ng5. It is not advisable for Black to try to hold the pawn.

There are four main moves for Black in this position. Two are attempts to hold the material and two are developmental moves that cheerfully hand the pawn straight back.

Surprisingly 3...Nf6 and 3...d5 with poorer results are played much more often than 3...e5 and 3...Nc6. If Black obliges you and plays one of the first two moves then you will play 4.d3.

After 4...exd3 (4.e3 is an alternative) 5.Bxd3 you reach the Main Starting Position of the Lisitsin Gambit Accepted. You will play tactically with your Bishop, Knight and Queen to exploit the inherent weaknesses of the d1-h5 and h5-e8 diagonals.


Bellon Gambit - Upset the Flow of White's English




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Bellon Gambit - 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 e4 4.Ng5 b5

The Bellon Gambit is a neat trick that appears in a well known line of the English Opening. You can play 3...e4 in an apparent attempt to harass White's f3-Knight. 4.Ng5 solves the problem and your e4-pawn faces being lost pretty soon.


Now comes the neat little trick. You can play the shocking 4...b5!? Suddenly White finds himself in a bind. 5.cxb5 allows 5...d5 supporting e4 and giving Black a fearsome center. 5.Nxe5 allows 5...c6 6.Nc3 d5.


Even 5.b3 fails against 5...b4 6.Nbxe4 h6 7.Nxf6 Qxf6. So why haven't we heard more about the Bellon? Well a solution was found. 5.d3 solves all White's problems. But then how many of your opponents are likely to find this not so obvious move?


Halibut Gambit - Black's Wing Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Halibut Gambit - 1.c4 b5

The Halibut Gambit is another way to disrupt the English opening by deflecting the key c4-pawn. You may follow up 2.cxb5 with 2...a6 and aim for an accelerated Benko Gambit. If you can get this ...Ba6 will frustrate White's Kingside development.


White can refuse the gambit with moves like 2.Nf3, 2.d3 or 2.d4. The first of these will probably lead to a game that isn't English in nature.


It might be useful to think of this as White playing the Wing Gambit except a tempo behind. It's not a line that White should worry about unduly. If you have the White pieces you must take care and favor development over the winning of any further material after 2.cxb5.


Blitz the Bird in the From Variation




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: From Gambit - 1.f4 e5

This little idea devised by From is the most aggressive reply to Bird's Opening. It gets crazy after 2.fxe5 d6 where Black wants to open lines for both Bishops at the cost of a pawn.


After 3.exd6 Bxd6, your compensation is clear. White has no development, just a gaping hole on his soft spot f2. For the price of a pawn you have two Bishops in the game and staring down open diagonals towards the Kingside. The Queen is also poised to potentially deliver a check.


In fact Black is threatening a # in 3 through the Queen and dark square Bishop along that weak e1-h4 diagonal. If you have White here you will obviously want to prevent that with 4.Nf3. Black can then continue positionally with 4...Nf6 or dynamically with the dangerous but double-edged 4...g5.


Throw the Sturm at d5




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Sturm Gambit - 1.f4 d5 2.c4

Throw the Sturm at Black in the safe knowledge that you can get free and easy development for the pawn. As White you can also be reasonably confident of rounding up the c4-pawn sooner or later.


This is why Black usually declines the Sturm. 2...c6 and 2...e6 are the most common moves. 2...Nf6, 2...e5 and the provocative 2...d4 are also possible.


White often ends up with three pawn chains in this opening. The central trio on d2, e3 and f4 tend to point the White Queen and Bishop pair towards the Black Kingside. As Black you can depend on d-file pressure against d2 for counterplay.


Launch Your Kingside Forward Williams Style




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Williams Gambit - 1.f4 d5 2.e4

This last line from Bird's Opening takes it's name from it's inventor, William L. Williams. This idea has too many holes in it to be considered at a serious level.


Having said that it can fool an amateur. Williams used it to score some quick victories against unsuspecting opponents. The first thing with this line is to be comfortable with your King playing in a slightly loose position. You won't be castling.


If you can tolerate a weak e1-h4 diagonal you may get some tactical chances if your opponent fluffs his lines. In exchange for opening up your Kingside (while your King is still hanging around there!), you can take over the center and Kingside, gaining attacking chances.


Cook the Bird with a Swiss Flavor




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Swiss Gambit - 1.f4 f5 2.e4

The dynamic and volatile Bird's Opening has yet another sacrificial idea for us called the Swiss. If Black tries a symmetrical reply you can choose the violent 2.e4 for the initiative.


2.e4 with a later d3 in mind gives up the pawn for a big lead in development and open lines and diagonals. As Black you will be banking on your unopposed center to give you an advantage later on. But first you must survive the onslaught.


After 2...fxe4, you have a few moves to consider as White. 3.Nc3 or 3.Bc4 are calm developing moves, the first also attacking the intruding pawn. 3.Qh5 or 3.f5 are the aggressive options with 3.f5 probably the better of these two.


Come Under Heavy Fire in Paris




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light square

Opening Systems: Paris Gambit - 1.Nh3 d5 2.g3 e5 3.f4 Bxh3 4.Bxh3 exf4 5.0-0

The Amar Opening has some land mines as well with one of these unearthed in Paris. The Amar starts with the unusual looking 1.Nh3. The purpose of this move is to control the f4 square.

After the moves 1.Nh3? d5 2.g3 e5 3.f4?! Bxh3 4.Bxh3 exf4 5.0-0!? we reach the Starting Position of the Paris. Of course you could have just restored the material balance with 5.gxf4. But you didn't play for this position just to play some quiet rational moves did you?

As White you make the brave (or foolish!) decision to expose your King on the Kingside. All for a bold initiative. In most games the entire Kingside pawn shell disappears. White scored poorly in the database. In four out five games his King could not survive the attacks from Black's Queen, Rook and/or minor pieces.


Grant Gambit - Sac Your Kingside to Get at Black




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareEmpty light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light square

Opening Systems: Grant Gambit - 1.Nh3 d5 2.g3 e5 3.f4 Bxh3 4.Bxh3 exf4 5.0-0 fxg3 6.hxg3

The Grant Gambit is a risky maneuver designed to give you a lead in development and an initiative. All at the cost of a pawn and some King safety.


You get an open f-file for your Rook and play on the Kingside. The h3-Bishop will stop Black castling Queenside. He may be unsure whether to castle Kingside in front of your pieces.


Now you have to get your Queenside developed quickly and bearing down on the Black King. You need to get to the enemy King first before Black gets his Queen and minor pieces down around your vulnerable leader.


Win the Diagonals in the Dada




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Dada Gambit - 1.g3 e5 2.Bg2 d5 3.b4

The Dada is a nice, neat little trick based around the old ploy of offering a Knight pawn as bait to an enemy Bishop. This sacrifice, if accepted, is followed up by another on the following move. Here you play the clever 4.c4! which would give your Bishops complete control of the open center.


You also have deadly resources like Qb3 up your sleeve which can exploit b7 which is unprotected in some lines. Black will need to play precisely to avoid falling victim to your traps.


Of course if you are playing with Black you don't have to accept the b4 present. It's also possible to develop a Knight with 3...Nc6 or 3...Nf6.


Fischer Gambit - Win the Pawn Fight




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Fischer Gambit - 1.b4 e5 2.Bb2 f6 3.e4

The Fischer Gambit, also called the Tartakower Gambit, is a ploy used to exploit Black's weaknesses on the a2-f7 diagonal. If Black accepts playing 3...Bxb4, the most common continuation will be 4.Bc4.

Your whole game plan will revolve around this diagonal and Black will struggle to castle. Of course he can decline. 3...d5, 3...Ne7 and 3...c6 have all been played regularly.

It seems very likely that the great Philidor would have loved playing this opening with either color. In most lines the battle rages as the two pawn shells go at it with the pieces waiting behind for a chance to eventually infiltrate. This gambit can build a great awareness of how to play with pawns.


Rip Up Black's Queenside with the Ware Gambit




Black Rook on a light squareBlack Knight on a dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
White pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareWhite Knight on a dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: Ware Gambit - 1.a4 e5 2.a5 d5 3.e3 f5 4.a6

The Ware Gambit is hardly a well beaten path. You start with 1.a4 which is called the Ware Opening. It seems like a wasted move which switches the advantage where White is now playing as Black and Black is playing as White.


Of course every move achieves something. When you move you take control of new squares. 1.a4 takes control of b5. The value of this move remains to be determined.


The game continues 2.a5 d5 3.e3 f5 4.a6 and this is the Starting Position of the Ware Gambit. Control of b5 is not the priority of this variation. You've allowed Black to gain the center and you are acting on the wing. If Black accepts the gambit he takes on problems with his pawn structure.


Moving On




Black Rook on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Bishop on a light squareBlack Queen on a dark squareBlack King on a light squareBlack Bishop on a dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareBlack Rook on a dark square
Black pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareBlack pawn on a light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareBlack pawn on a light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareBlack Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareWhite Bishop on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareBlack pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
Empty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark square
Empty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareEmpty dark squareEmpty light square
White pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareEmpty light squareWhite pawn on a dark squareWhite pawn on a light squareWhite pawn on a dark square
White Rook on a dark squareWhite Knight on a light squareWhite Bishop on a dark squareWhite Queen on a light squareWhite King on a dark squareEmpty light squareEmpty dark squareWhite Rook on a light square

Opening Systems: The famous Ruy Lopez Opening devised by the earliest famous chess master

Playing Gambits is one of the most enjoyable ways to play chess. Giving your opponent a material advantage and challenging yourself to use the edge gained in return to overcome the odds and win the game.


This approach to the game obligates you to play with energy and purpose right through to the end. It instills some great habits in your game play in terms of neutralizing complacency and the insidious tendency to drift.


Who first came up with the idea of giving away material in order to gain a more important advantage? Who figured out that a human opponent could be vulnerable to the positional or dynamic dangers that would result? These ideas began with the earliest chess masters.


> Opening Systems